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“Whip me, crush me; you need not mind those people under the rick! I shall not cry out. Once victim, always victim, that’s the law.”-Explain.

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles is a notable literary work by Thomas Hardy. A complete discussion of this literary work is given, which will help you enhance your literary skills and prepare for the exam. Read the main text, key info, Summary, Themes, Characters, Literary Devices, Quotations, Notes, to various questions of Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

Answer

Whip me, crush me; you need not mind those people under the rick! I shall not cry out. Once victim, always victim, that’s the law.

In “Tess of the D’Urbervilles” (1891) by Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), Tess talks about how she feels like a victim. She declares it does not matter if someone mistreats or takes advantage of her. She will not complain or cry out for help. She believes that once a person has been a victim, they are always a victim; there is nothing they can do to change that.

Tess’s words reveal a lot about her character and the society she lives in. She comes from a low-income family and faces many challenges in her life. She has been mistreated and taken advantage of by more powerful than her. This has made her feel powerless and resigned to her fate. The phrase “Whip me, crush me” suggests that Tess has endured much pain and suffering. She uses these words metaphorically to describe how others treat her poorly. When Tess says, “You need not mind those people under the rick,” she is telling the person not to worry about the consequences of their actions. She is willing to bear the burden of suffering alone and not affect others. The idea that “once victim, always victim” reflects the harsh reality of Tess’s world. In her society, social class and gender play a significant role in determining a person’s fate. Tess feels trapped by these societal expectations and believes that no matter what she does, she will always be a victim of circumstances beyond her control.

To sum up, this quote highlights the theme of powerlessness and victimization in Tess’s life. It shows the reader the challenges she faces and her resignation in the face of a society that often mistreats her.